We Have Beds Available! Call for Same Day Admission.877-669-0598

We Have Beds Available! Call for Same Day Admission.877-669-0598

how to strengthen your relationship with god
How to Strengthen your Relationship with God in Recovery
June 17, 2021
benefits of faith based addiction treatment
Benefits of Faith-Based Addiction Treatment
July 1, 2021
how to strengthen your relationship with god
How to Strengthen your Relationship with God in Recovery
June 17, 2021
benefits of faith based addiction treatment
Benefits of Faith-Based Addiction Treatment
July 1, 2021
 

Effects of Depressants on the Central Nervous System

Central nervous system (CNS) depressants are drugs that reduce brain activity, making them effective for treating conditions like insomnia, anxiety disorders, panic attacks, sleep disorders, chronic pain, and seizures.

The effects of depressants on the central nervous system involve a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which plays a role in slowing brain activity. We’re expanding on depressants, how they affect the central nervous system, and why they’re dangerous.

 

What are central nervous system depressants and how do they work?

Central nervous system (CNS) depressants are drugs that reduce brain activity, making them effective for treating conditions like insomnia, anxiety disorders, panic attacks, sleep disorders, chronic pain, and seizures. These drugs operate by affecting the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which plays a crucial role in slowing down brain activity. The effects of depressants on the central nervous system involve a complex interplay with GABA, resulting in side effects such as drowsiness, relaxation, and decreased inhibition.

Different classes of CNS depressants work in varying ways, all aimed at slowing activity in the central nervous system and reducing levels of awareness. Among the common examples of depressants are alcohol, barbiturates (including Amytal, Butisol, and Nembutal), benzodiazepines (including Valium, Ativan, and Klonopin), most sleeping pills (including Ambien, Sonata, and Lunesta), and opioids (including Codeine, Fentanyl, and Hydrocodone). While some of these drugs are considered safer than others, it is essential to note that almost all depressants have the potential for addiction and should only be taken as prescribed by a healthcare professional.

Many individuals may develop a dependency on depressants due to misuse, such as using them differently than directed or without a valid prescription. The misuse of these medications, whether through sharing prescription drugs or combining them with alcohol, can lead to addiction. Over time, individuals may build a tolerance to these drugs, resulting in a cycle of escalating use. Withdrawal symptoms can be uncomfortable, driving individuals to continue their drug abuse until they lose control over their usage.

A critical part of the recovery process for individuals struggling with depressant addiction is medically monitored detox. This detox process, as offered at Faith in Recovery, provides patients with 24-hour guidance and medical support to help them safely taper off these substances. By undergoing detox and receiving proper treatment, individuals increase their chances of successfully overcoming addiction and moving forward in their recovery journey.

Examples of Depressant Drugs and Their Effects

Different classes of CNS depressants work differently, but all can slow activity in the central nervous system and reduce levels of awareness. While some are considered safer than others, almost all depressants can be addictive and should only be taken if and as prescribed.

 

Some common examples of depressants include:

  • Alcohol
  • Barbiturates (including Amytal, Butisol, and Nembutal)
  • Benzodiazepines (including Valium, Ativan, and Klonopin)
  • Most sleeping pills (including Ambien, Sonata, and Lunesta)
  • Opioids (including Codeine, Fentanyl, and Hydrocodone)

 

Many people become addicted to depressants because they begin using them differently than directed or using them without a prescription. From sharing their prescription drugs with others to mixing them with alcohol, there are many ways a person can misuse medications that can lead to addiction. As time progresses, the tolerance they build will cause them to continuously repeat this pattern of behavior.

Because uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms can occur, they may continue abusing these drugs until they’re no longer able to control their use at all. Our medically monitored detox at Faith in Recovery has helped many patients recover from addiction by helping them safely and slowly wean off of drugs. Detox is a crucial step in the recovery treatment process that offers patients 24-hour guidance and medical assistance, increasing their chances of completing withdrawal and moving forward in treatment.

 

The typical primary effects of central nervous system depressants include:

  • Relaxation
  • Euphoria
  • Drowsiness
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Confusion
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulties urinating
  • Sleepiness
  • Dizziness
  • Memory loss
  • Slowed reflexes and reaction time
  • Loss of coordination
  • Slurred speech
  • Impaired judgment
  • Blacking out

 

Long-term use of depressants can not only cause addiction but can also lead to a variety of adverse effects. As previously mentioned, chronic abusers of depressants develop tolerance and require increasing doses of the medication to maintain the same effects. Other potential long-term effects of depressants include:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Hypersomnia
  • Difficulties breathing
  • Difficulties sleeping
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Weight gain
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Physical dependence
  • Addiction

 

Another possible side effect of depressants on the CNS is overdose. Excessive use or consumption of these drugs can cause an overdose marked by symptoms like respiratory depression, seizures, and even death. CNS depressants should never be taken with other substances that can cause sedation, including painkillers, over-the-counter allergy medicines, and alcohol. Combinations like Xanax and Benadryl can cause adverse reactions like respiratory depression and increase the individual’s risk of death by overdose. This risk also increases if CNS depressants are mixed with stimulant drugs like cocaine or Adderall.

How does Faith In Recovery tailor treatment plans for individuals struggling with CNS depressant addiction?

At Faith in Recovery, our treatment facility goes above and beyond to tailor treatment plans for individuals battling CNS depressant addiction. As time progresses, the tolerance they build will cause them to continuously repeat this pattern of behavior. Our medically monitored detox program has helped numerous patients break free from addiction by providing them with the vital support needed to safely and gradually wean off drugs. This crucial detox phase offers around-the-clock guidance and medical assistance, significantly enhancing patients' chances of successfully completing withdrawal and progressing through treatment. Our comprehensive rehab center offers a range of treatment options, including specialized programs for prescription pill addiction. To discover more about the tailored treatment plans and personalized care we provide, please reach out to us at 888-280-4763.

What is the general treatment process for addiction to CNS depressants?

At Faith in Recovery, our medically monitored detox program has successfully guided many individuals through the process of safely weaning off central nervous system depressants and other drugs. We understand the significance of detox as a crucial initial step in the treatment journey, providing round-the-clock support and medical assistance to ensure a smooth withdrawal process and pave the way for progress in treatment. Our comprehensive approach encompasses a variety of treatment options tailored to meet the unique needs of each individual struggling with addiction. Whether it's CNS depressants or other substances, our rehab center offers specialized prescription pill addiction treatment alongside a range of therapeutic interventions designed to support lasting recovery. If you or someone you know is facing the challenges of addiction, rest assured that effective treatment solutions are within reach at Faith in Recovery.

What are some potentially life-threatening complications of withdrawing from CNS depressants?

Withdrawal from CNS depressants can have serious implications, including potential life-threatening complications. It is crucial to be aware of the risks associated with abruptly discontinuing the use of these drugs, as doing so can lead to severe consequences. Seeking medical assistance for a medically-assisted detox is highly recommended to ensure a safe and gradual withdrawal process. Additionally, it is important to note that overdose is a significant concern when it comes to CNS depressants. Overconsumption of these substances can result in an overdose, characterized by symptoms such as respiratory depression, seizures, and even death. Mixing CNS depressants with other sedative substances like painkillers, over-the-counter allergy medicines, or alcohol can further exacerbate the risks of overdose. Combining depressants with stimulant drugs like cocaine or Adderall can also have dangerous consequences, increasing the likelihood of respiratory depression and raising the individual's risk of a fatal overdose. Therefore, it is essential to approach the use of CNS depressants with caution and always seek medical guidance when withdrawing from these substances or managing their consumption.

What are barbiturates and their impact on the body?

Barbiturates, including Amytal, Butisol, and Nembutal, are examples of CNS depressants that work to slow activity in the central nervous system. These drugs can cause relaxation, euphoria, drowsiness, decreased blood pressure, confusion, disorientation, difficulties urinating, sleepiness, dizziness, memory loss, slowed reflexes and reaction time, loss of coordination, slurred speech, impaired judgment, and blacking out. Long-term use of barbiturates can lead to addiction, chronic fatigue, hypersomnia, difficulties breathing, difficulties sleeping, depression, suicidal thoughts, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, physical dependence, and overdose, which can result in respiratory depression, seizures, and death. Furthermore, barbiturates were previously regarded as a generally safe depressant, but problems with abuse, addiction, and overdose quickly became apparent after widespread prescription. These drugs can generate a sense of euphoria and relaxation even when taken in small doses, which encourages abuse in some. Barbiturates have also shown to have a dramatic impact on sleep patterns, resulting in suppressed REM sleep. In response to particularly high abuse rates from the 1950s to the 1970s, benzodiazepines, which are generally regarded as less addictive and less likely to cause overdose, were developed and popularized. Because the potential for addiction and overdose is so high, the drugs are no longer commonly used to treat anxiety and sleep problems.

What are the effects of alcohol as a CNS depressant?

Alcohol, a widely used CNS depressant, can bring about a range of effects on the brain depending on the quantity and speed of consumption. Initially, individuals may experience positive behavioral changes, feeling less reserved and more at ease due to the chemical alterations triggered by alcohol. However, as consumption escalates, the brain becomes increasingly affected, potentially leading to negative emotional responses such as anxiety, stress, anger, aggression, and depression. It is crucial to recognize that alcohol, despite its initial appeal, acts as a CNS depressant and can have adverse impacts on mental well-being.

Misuse of depressants, including alcohol, can result in addiction, as individuals deviate from prescribed usage or mix medications with alcohol. Over time, tolerance may develop, prompting a cycle of escalating consumption to maintain desired effects. The primary effects of CNS depressants encompass relaxation, euphoria, drowsiness, decreased blood pressure, confusion, disorientation, sleepiness, dizziness, memory loss, slowed reflexes, loss of coordination, slurred speech, impaired judgment, and blackouts.

Prolonged use of depressants, like alcohol, may lead to addiction and a host of detrimental effects. Chronic abusers often develop tolerance, necessitating higher doses for the same impact. Long-term consequences may include chronic fatigue, hypersomnia, breathing difficulties, sleep disturbances, depression, suicidal ideation, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, physical dependence, and addiction. Additionally, combining CNS depressants with other sedative substances like painkillers or alcohol can have severe consequences, potentially resulting in respiratory depression, seizures, or even death.

It is crucial to exercise caution and avoid mixing alcohol with other sedative substances to prevent harmful outcomes. Understanding the effects of alcohol as a CNS depressant, including its potential for addiction and overdose, is vital for promoting safe and responsible consumption.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with an addiction to CNS depressants or any other drugs, know that treatment options are available. Our rehab center offers prescription pill addiction treatment among a variety of different treatment options. To learn more about our facility or rehab programs, call us now at 888-280-4763.